Workplace bullying, and the futility of it all

All of us who have worked in any organisation would have had our fair share of bosses good and bad. The good bosses are those who take you under their wing, teach you the ropes and guide you through the organisational maze. They are those who inspire ordinary people to do extraordinary things. There are also bosses who bark and snarl their instructions or orders, point a critical finger at every opportunity and even tick you off at meetings and seminars. The human mind is geared to sift the good memories from the bad and retain them to dwell on in tranquil moments. The bad memories are best given a decent burial.

However, the published results of some recent research at the University of Manchester on workplace behaviour brought to my mind a few bosses I would rather not have encountered. The research states that “people working for bosses who display psychopathic and narcissistic tendencies” not only feel depressed because of constant bullying but are also likely to engage in counterproductive behaviour. All the aggressive, toxic rhetoric can whittle down your ego and reduce you to a robot.

MORE  >>>

Fatal heart attack may have resulted from years of workplace bullying: WCB ruling

(Canadian OH&S News) — The Workers Compensation Board of Prince Edward Island (WCB) recently awarded benefits to a Hazelbrook, P.E.I. woman, after ruling that her husband’s death by cardiac arrest had been linked to workplace bullying.

Eric Donovan, 47, was a longtime employee of Queens County Residential Services (QCRS) who passed away on Nov. 11, 2013. The WCB awarded benefits to Donovan’s widow, Lisa Donovan, following a three-year legal proceeding. The ruling reportedly occurred last December, but was not publicized by the media until late March.

The award to Lisa Donovan was “based on a finding of fact that there was bullying, that there was resultant stress, that that stress was of a degree in severity that induced a heart attack, and that heart attack was fatal,” said her lawyer, James W. Macnutt, a partner with Charlottetown law firm Macnutt & Dumont.

MORE  >>>

With cyber-bullying on the rise, children, women being pushed over the edge (India)

15-year-old Ankush (name changed) had been active on social media ever since he got his hands on a computer. After creating an account on Facebook, bypassing the minimum age criteria, he was soon a part of his school’s online community.

Soon, however, the school canteen was abuzz with gossip as Ankush became the butt of everyone’s jokes and was trolled on a daily basis.

“I have a small face and my hair sticks up, so they called me ‘pineapple face’. I did not mind it as even my seniors called me that. At least they knew about me,” said Ankush.

However, what started as a trickle turned into a flood of incessant trolling, as his bullies made a hate page in his name and photoshopped his face to poke fun at him, reducing his existence to a meme.

That was when Ankush started to cut himself with a blade, frustrated that he could not even talk to his parents about this issue, as he was asked not to open a Facebook profile. “I used to cut my right forearm and conceal it with a sports band. I would show it to my friends, who asked me to stop hurting myself,” he says.

MORE  >>>

HSE survey flags bullying concern (Ireland)

Less than half of respondents would recommend the HSE as an employer to family/friends

A new staff survey carried out by the HSE has found that 28 per cent of respondents had been subjected to assault, verbal or physical, in the workplace, and 31 per cent experienced bullying or harassment, with another 46 per cent witnessing bullying or harassment in the past two years.

The response rate for the HSE Employee Engagement Survey ‘Your Opinion Counts’, which found that a focus on bullying and harassment in the Irish health service was required, was only 15 per cent — although this was more than double the response rate of a similar poll conducted in 2014 (7%).

MORE  >>>

Anti-Semitic bullying forces Jewish teen from Berlin high school

The story of a 14-year-old who had to change schools to escape anti-Semitism is making headlines in Germany. The boy’s tormentors were of Arab and Turkish descent – making the news even more explosive.

The story about the teenager, which originally ran in the UK newspaper “The Jewish Chronicle,” featured in the weekend editions of many German newspapers as well as the online edition of respected news magazine “Der Spiegel.”
The “Chronicle” reported that 14-year-old “Phillip” (not his real name) transferred from the Gemeinschaftschule in the Friedenau district of Berlin to another school after suffering anti-Semitic abuse. The teenager was subjected to verbal harassment after revealing he was Jewish. He was also grabbed and threatened with a realistic-looking pistol that later turned out to be fake.

MORE  >>>