Category Archives: RESEARCH

Workplace bullying, and the futility of it all

All of us who have worked in any organisation would have had our fair share of bosses good and bad. The good bosses are those who take you under their wing, teach you the ropes and guide you through the organisational maze. They are those who inspire ordinary people to do extraordinary things. There are also bosses who bark and snarl their instructions or orders, point a critical finger at every opportunity and even tick you off at meetings and seminars. The human mind is geared to sift the good memories from the bad and retain them to dwell on in tranquil moments. The bad memories are best given a decent burial.

However, the published results of some recent research at the University of Manchester on workplace behaviour brought to my mind a few bosses I would rather not have encountered. The research states that “people working for bosses who display psychopathic and narcissistic tendencies” not only feel depressed because of constant bullying but are also likely to engage in counterproductive behaviour. All the aggressive, toxic rhetoric can whittle down your ego and reduce you to a robot.

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Parents’ advice can support or undermine targets of school bullying-prevention programs

WASHINGTON (March 21, 2017) – Children who are bystanders to a bullying incident are more likely to intervene if their parents have given them advice to intervene and less likely to intervene if their parents tell them to “stay out of it,” according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, a journal of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. The study suggests that culturally-consistent family components may enhance and promote the success of school-based anti-bullying efforts.

“Bullying is a serious problem for children, schools, and families. Our research suggests that parents have the power to address this problem through the advice they give their children at home. Nearly all children are involved in bullying situations as bystanders even if they are not a bully or a victim, so it is important that parents talk with their children about ways they can intervene if they witness someone being bullied,” said Stevie Grassetti, PhD, Post-Doctoral Researcher at the University of Delaware, and lead author of the study. “Bystander children play a powerful role in stopping bullying.”

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Girls are more affected by cyberbullying

Cyberbullying affects girls more than boys – putting them off school and raising the risk of truancy, according to new research.

Being involved in the modern life scourge – either as perpetrators, victims or both – makes them feel less accepted by their peers, while boys are more able to brush it off.

And this has a knock on effect, spilling over into how important they felt school and learning were, the study found.

With boys, just those who had been a bully as well as a victim, had the same negative attitude.

It follows a government survey that found girls are twice as likely to be ‘cyberbullied’, in which youngsters use technology to harass peers, than boys.

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Arizona LGBTQ students face hostility, survey says

Arizona high schools remain hostile environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer students due to a lack of support and resources, according to findings from a recently released survey.

The Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), which has administered the survey since 1999, argues that the presence of school-based supports for LGBTQ students results in lower levels of harassment and better educational outcomes.

For Arizona specifically, the report found that the vast majority of LGBTQ students regularly heard anti-LGBTQ remarks and had been victimized at school. It also found that many LGBTQ students in Arizona reported discriminatory policies or practices at their schools.

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Split-Half Administration of the 2015 School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey

(This report, which issued in December, includes an interesting discussion regarding the inclusion of “repetition” and “power imbalance” in the definition of bullying.  The results are remarkably different, depending on whether they are included or left out.  When they are included, the rate of victimization drops.  Many of my colleagues have questioned whether these elements property belong in the definition of bullying, at least in the school setting.  This report suggests they may be right.

On the other hand, they may be appropriate for identifying and correcting bullying behavior in the workplace.  As the Workplace Bullying Institute has found through multiple surveys, most workplace bullying is conducted by supervisory level employees on subordinates.  The “power imbalance” is baked into the hierarchical administrative structure common to most workplaces.  — Mike Tully, Editor.)

The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is the primary federal entity for collecting, analyzing, and reporting data related to education in the United States and other nations. It fulfills a Congressional mandate to collect, collate, analyze, and report full and complete statistics on the condition of education in the United States; conduct and publish reports and specialized analyses of the meaning and significance of such statistics; assist state and local education agencies in improving their statistical systems; and review and report on education activities in foreign countries.

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