Monthly Archives: March 2017

Why threats to get votes for health law are more workplace bullying than political tactics

In an effort to pass the health care law, Donald Trump placed intense political pressure on members of the House, even telling one key lawmaker “I’m going to come after you,” according to reports. The president has also made personal attacks on members of the judiciary.

How do these strong-arm tactics – I would call it bullying and intimidation – affect the workings of Washington? After all, the president, as the leader of the executive branch of our government, is responsible for establishing the organizational culture and monitoring the behavior of his administration.

As a citizen, a taxpayer and a psychologist, I’m concerned that we have a chief executive exhibiting behavior that would be considered bullying in business. By setting the example that bullying is okay at the top, it could become acceptable practice in our government and by extension in our businesses. And research suggests that could not only be detrimental to the health of individuals being bullied, but also harm the country overall.

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Have you been bullied at work? Share your stories (UK)

(Editor’s Note:  I am also interested in hearing stories of workplace bullying.  I am currently working on a book on the identification, prevention and correction of workplace bullying and need more examples of actual workplace bullying incidents and situations to include.  If you are willing to share you experience, please contact me through email or through my Facebook page.  Your privacy will be respected and protected.  Thanks.  — Mike Tully)

From bosses who try to sabotage their employees’ efforts, to colleagues who intimidate their co-workers or provoke them to tears: bullying at work is surprisingly common.

Nearly a third of workers in the UK experience ongoing intimidation. And with the rise in zero-hour contracts, insecure employment and cuts to legal aid, the problem can only get worse.

Studies show that bullies tend to be bosses or those in authority, making it hard for workers to speak up. “It is easy to denounce bullying,” says employment writer Stefan Stern. “The harder task is to understand why it is happening and to suggest ways of dealing with it.”

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Parents’ advice can support or undermine targets of school bullying-prevention programs

WASHINGTON (March 21, 2017) – Children who are bystanders to a bullying incident are more likely to intervene if their parents have given them advice to intervene and less likely to intervene if their parents tell them to “stay out of it,” according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, a journal of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. The study suggests that culturally-consistent family components may enhance and promote the success of school-based anti-bullying efforts.

“Bullying is a serious problem for children, schools, and families. Our research suggests that parents have the power to address this problem through the advice they give their children at home. Nearly all children are involved in bullying situations as bystanders even if they are not a bully or a victim, so it is important that parents talk with their children about ways they can intervene if they witness someone being bullied,” said Stevie Grassetti, PhD, Post-Doctoral Researcher at the University of Delaware, and lead author of the study. “Bystander children play a powerful role in stopping bullying.”

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Culture change needed to tackle bullying problem at South Canterbury DHB , chief executive says

A “change in culture” is needed to tackle an apparent bullying issue within the South Canterbury District Health Board (SCDHB), its chief executive says.

The results of the DHB’s Staff Engagement and Wellbeing Survey, carried out in November and December last year, show 41 per cent of staff disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement bullying was not tolerated in their work area.

Chief executive Nigel Trainor said he was “not surprised” by the survey results.

The survey was completed by 377 people, 39 per cent of the DHB’s staff.

Trainor said bullying was “not unique” to the SCDHB, but was a wider problem within the New Zealand health system.

“There’s not a lot of surprises in this to be honest. This is really confirming what I potentially believed was the case.

​”There’s a lot of bullying in health as a whole and it’s something we want to bring out to the fore and tackle, actually look at what we can do about that.”

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