Category Archives: SCHOOL

Parents’ advice can support or undermine targets of school bullying-prevention programs

WASHINGTON (March 21, 2017) – Children who are bystanders to a bullying incident are more likely to intervene if their parents have given them advice to intervene and less likely to intervene if their parents tell them to “stay out of it,” according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, a journal of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. The study suggests that culturally-consistent family components may enhance and promote the success of school-based anti-bullying efforts.

“Bullying is a serious problem for children, schools, and families. Our research suggests that parents have the power to address this problem through the advice they give their children at home. Nearly all children are involved in bullying situations as bystanders even if they are not a bully or a victim, so it is important that parents talk with their children about ways they can intervene if they witness someone being bullied,” said Stevie Grassetti, PhD, Post-Doctoral Researcher at the University of Delaware, and lead author of the study. “Bystander children play a powerful role in stopping bullying.”

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Girls are more affected by cyberbullying

Cyberbullying affects girls more than boys – putting them off school and raising the risk of truancy, according to new research.

Being involved in the modern life scourge – either as perpetrators, victims or both – makes them feel less accepted by their peers, while boys are more able to brush it off.

And this has a knock on effect, spilling over into how important they felt school and learning were, the study found.

With boys, just those who had been a bully as well as a victim, had the same negative attitude.

It follows a government survey that found girls are twice as likely to be ‘cyberbullied’, in which youngsters use technology to harass peers, than boys.

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Bullied: Hidden cameras expose schoolyard horrors

The bullying began the moment 14-year-old Kelsey arrived at school.

“F***ing p***ter. Shemale. I wanna smash the mop head. F*** yourself,” disguised voices shouted, in vision where identities are blurred.

And how was that footage captured? By a hidden camera, given to a child who was being bullied at school, by a TV production company.

The footage was the linchpin of a documentary, Bullied, which screened on Tuesday night on the ABC.

It’s a controversial concept because neither the school nor the parents of its pupils had given their permission for the filming to take place.

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State Department of Education: Intervention is slowing down bullying in schools

BOISE, Idaho (KBOI) — New data on bullying is giving hope to Idaho educators.

“It’s hard to have great schools when students don’t feel safe,” said State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Sherri Ybarra. “It affects their academics, it affects their emotional well being.”

Which is why Ybarra says she’s made it a top priority to promote bullying awareness. She encourages training parents, staff and students to recognize bullying and provide the tools necessary to stop it.

One of those tools is requiring districts and charter schools to report bullying incidents at the end of each school year. The department hopes this will provide a snap shot of how many students are being bullied, and if intervention is working.

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Kenyans react to bullying at Alliance High

Kenyans on the Internet were horrified after details leading to the early retirement of a principal in one of the country’s leading schools emerged.

The brutal stories of bullying and mistreatment of Form One students at the Alliance High School have left many with a bitter taste in their mouths and they have posted different reactions social media after photos of one of the victims became public.

Many feel that the punishment meted out against the principal was too lenient and more action should be taken to curb the vice.

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Cyber-bullying cases doubled this year, middle school official says (Iowa)

MUSCATINE, Iowa — Alexis Kirk, 11, was about to go to bed one night when her phone started buzzing incessantly.

Someone had added her to a group chat on Facebook Messenger, to which her peers were posting insults about a friend.

Alexis showed the phone to her mom, Angie Kirk.

“I read it and I got on (her Facebook) and I typed ‘This is Alexis’ mom and I highly suggest that every one of you get to bed right now cause I’m getting a hold of your parents,’” Angie said.

Angie called the vice principal of West Middle School and the mother of the girl who was being bullied.

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Arizona LGBTQ students face hostility, survey says

Arizona high schools remain hostile environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer students due to a lack of support and resources, according to findings from a recently released survey.

The Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), which has administered the survey since 1999, argues that the presence of school-based supports for LGBTQ students results in lower levels of harassment and better educational outcomes.

For Arizona specifically, the report found that the vast majority of LGBTQ students regularly heard anti-LGBTQ remarks and had been victimized at school. It also found that many LGBTQ students in Arizona reported discriminatory policies or practices at their schools.

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Japan Moves to Curb LGBT Bullying

Last year, we interviewed lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth from across Japan and what we heard was harrowing: harassment and violence were common, prompting some bullied kids to drop out of school. Our report shed light on the plight of this often-silenced minority, and how even well-intentioned teachers were ill-equipped to respond to cases of LGBT bullying.

That may be about to change.

The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (MEXT) has added LGBT-specific protections to its revised draft on the national bullying prevention policy, scheduled to be finalized in March.

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5-day deadline to report school bullying goes to Va. governor

RICHMOND — Virginia principals would be required to notify parents of bullies and their victims within five days of any report of bullying under a bill given final approval by the General Assembly Friday.

While the agreement to require the notification within five school days sailed through the Senate, it sparked debate from some House members who wanted the deadline extended.

“If my child was bullying, was being bullied, I would want to know,” responded the bill’s sponsor, Del. Eileen Filler-Corn, a Democrat representing Virginia’s 41st District.

She hopes the notifications could prevent bullying, including online.

Another delegate, Marcus Simon, said the notification could have helped him.

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Some Teachers, Principals And Students Condemn Trump Transgender Policy

Some students, principals, parents and attorneys have condemned the Trump administration’s decision to remove some federal protections for transgender students.

Those protections had been issued by President Obama, who cited the federal Title IX law, and instructed public schools last year to allow transgender students to use restrooms and locker rooms that match their gender identities.

But the Departments of Education and Justice on Tuesday reversed that guidance, allowing state and local officials to pass rules that discriminate on the basis of gender identity without risk of losing federal funds, as we reported.

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