Category Archives: BULLYING

Parents’ advice can support or undermine targets of school bullying-prevention programs

WASHINGTON (March 21, 2017) – Children who are bystanders to a bullying incident are more likely to intervene if their parents have given them advice to intervene and less likely to intervene if their parents tell them to “stay out of it,” according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, a journal of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. The study suggests that culturally-consistent family components may enhance and promote the success of school-based anti-bullying efforts.

“Bullying is a serious problem for children, schools, and families. Our research suggests that parents have the power to address this problem through the advice they give their children at home. Nearly all children are involved in bullying situations as bystanders even if they are not a bully or a victim, so it is important that parents talk with their children about ways they can intervene if they witness someone being bullied,” said Stevie Grassetti, PhD, Post-Doctoral Researcher at the University of Delaware, and lead author of the study. “Bystander children play a powerful role in stopping bullying.”

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Culture change needed to tackle bullying problem at South Canterbury DHB , chief executive says

A “change in culture” is needed to tackle an apparent bullying issue within the South Canterbury District Health Board (SCDHB), its chief executive says.

The results of the DHB’s Staff Engagement and Wellbeing Survey, carried out in November and December last year, show 41 per cent of staff disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement bullying was not tolerated in their work area.

Chief executive Nigel Trainor said he was “not surprised” by the survey results.

The survey was completed by 377 people, 39 per cent of the DHB’s staff.

Trainor said bullying was “not unique” to the SCDHB, but was a wider problem within the New Zealand health system.

“There’s not a lot of surprises in this to be honest. This is really confirming what I potentially believed was the case.

​”There’s a lot of bullying in health as a whole and it’s something we want to bring out to the fore and tackle, actually look at what we can do about that.”

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Obesity in the workplace

(The United States takes a similar approach to obesity as the United Kingdom.  While obesity, per se, is not generally considered a disabling condition, certain maladies related to obesity are.  For example, some individuals with obesity also suffer from diabetes.  In addition, obesity can lead to musculoskeletal problems, especially with the knees and feet.  Some employers regard morbid obesity — generally 100 pounds over what is considered a normal weight — as constituting a disability, regardless of whether there are any related conditions.  — Mike  Tully)

With reports suggesting long-term sickness and absence may be fuelled by Britain’s obesity crisis, organisations are finding themselves under pressure to foster a culture of healthy eating and living within the workplace. But they are likely to find themselves with an increasingly tricky line to tread as they work to encourage healthy living, while not seeming to be discriminatory.

The relationship between obesity and absence from work hit the headlines in December 2016 when Dame Carol Black, who advised the government on the relationship between work and health, suggested people on benefits who are obese should attend sessions with a health adviser. This, Dame Carol argued, could encourage more people claiming benefits back into work.

Cost to the economy

A 2015 report by McKinsey & Company said obesity costs the UK nearly £47bn a year, with Nice reporting that an obese person takes on average four extra sick days a year.

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A 7 Step Process For Stopping Work Bullies In Their Tracks

Publicly trashing ideas with the intention to belittle others, scoffing and dismissing any suggestions or proposals made in meetings, openly making snide remarks and frequently denouncing fellow team members at work; these are some of the common characteristics that categorize bullies at work.

American bullying experts Drs. Gary and Ruth Namie ​define bullying as a “Repeated, health-harming mistreatment of a person by one or more workers that takes the form of verbal abuse; conduct or behaviors that are threatening, intimidating, or humiliating; sabotage that prevents work from getting done; or some combination of the three.”

The bully aims to assault the dignity, trustworthiness, competence, and self-worth of the target to derive personal gains or sadistic satisfaction, often leaving the target feeling responsible, guilty, isolated and confused.

So what can we do to stop these baddies in their tracks?

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Bullied: Hidden cameras expose schoolyard horrors

The bullying began the moment 14-year-old Kelsey arrived at school.

“F***ing p***ter. Shemale. I wanna smash the mop head. F*** yourself,” disguised voices shouted, in vision where identities are blurred.

And how was that footage captured? By a hidden camera, given to a child who was being bullied at school, by a TV production company.

The footage was the linchpin of a documentary, Bullied, which screened on Tuesday night on the ABC.

It’s a controversial concept because neither the school nor the parents of its pupils had given their permission for the filming to take place.

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Workplace bullying: The importance of periodic survey data

The Workplace Bullying Institute’s scientific public surveys about the prevalence and nature of workplace bullying in America have been one of the most useful sets of statistical data about this form of mistreatment. Done in partnership with major international polling firm, WBI’s 2014, 2010, and 2007 surveys have been widely cited by the media and by researchers. Advocates for the anti-bullying Healthy Workplace Bill also cite survey results to lawmakers.

WBI is planning a national survey for 2017 and is conducting a crowdfunding campaign to raise monies to cover some of the costs.

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State Department of Education: Intervention is slowing down bullying in schools

BOISE, Idaho (KBOI) — New data on bullying is giving hope to Idaho educators.

“It’s hard to have great schools when students don’t feel safe,” said State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Sherri Ybarra. “It affects their academics, it affects their emotional well being.”

Which is why Ybarra says she’s made it a top priority to promote bullying awareness. She encourages training parents, staff and students to recognize bullying and provide the tools necessary to stop it.

One of those tools is requiring districts and charter schools to report bullying incidents at the end of each school year. The department hopes this will provide a snap shot of how many students are being bullied, and if intervention is working.

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Types of workplace bullying and potential legal protections in the U.S.

Last year, counselor Rosemary K.M. Sword and noted psychologist Philip Zimbardo wrote up a nice little summary about the types of bullying that one might encounter in our society, including workplaces, for their Psychology Today blog, Time Cure. I’d like to take a quick look at those categories and then briefly discuss what potential legal protections may be available in cases of bullying at work.

Sword and Zimbardo identified six basic categories of bullying, while recognizing that these forms may overlap:

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Trudeau says government serious about eliminating workplace harassment, including in the RCMP

OTTAWA—Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is endorsing the Mounties’ controversial efforts to tackle an endemic problem of workplace harassment. But the prime minister stopped short of directly stating full confidence in the Mounties’ top commanding officer.

In the wake of a scathing court ruling this week about the RCMP’s “outrageous” harassment and bullying of one of its own members, Sgt. Peter Merrifield, Trudeau was asked if he still had confidence in RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson.

“I, uh, we all, ah, are agreed, including Commissioner Paulson, but certainly everyone in this government that harassment is unacceptable and whether it be in the Canadian Armed Forces or within the RCMP or even within Parliament, I have shown zero-tolerance for harassment and sexual assault,” Trudeau said Thursday at a news conference at the naval base in Esquimault, B.C.

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