Category Archives: BULLYING

Bullying of part-timers pushing women out of police force

Police forces will struggle to retain women while part-time workers are bullied, the Police Federation of Australia says.

A new survey of 11,000 police across Australia found that one third of officers on family-flexible hours reported being victimised for their work choices. Of those, the vast majority were women.

The Police Federation study also found that, on average, female officers leave the force after seven years of service.

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San Diego Unified to fight Islamophobia, bullying

San Diego Unified School District administrators and teachers will have calendars showing Islamic holidays, students will learn more about the religion in social studies classes and safe places will be created on campuses for Muslim students as part of a multi-tiered approach to combat Islamophobia.

Trustees on Tuesday voted 4-0, with board member Michael McQuary absent, to approve a plan to confront Islamophobia and bullying against Muslim students.

Stan Anjan, executive director of Family and Community Engagement at the district, said elements of the plan will be laid out before the end of the school year with a goal of having it in place at the start of the fall semester.

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Workplace bullying, and the futility of it all

All of us who have worked in any organisation would have had our fair share of bosses good and bad. The good bosses are those who take you under their wing, teach you the ropes and guide you through the organisational maze. They are those who inspire ordinary people to do extraordinary things. There are also bosses who bark and snarl their instructions or orders, point a critical finger at every opportunity and even tick you off at meetings and seminars. The human mind is geared to sift the good memories from the bad and retain them to dwell on in tranquil moments. The bad memories are best given a decent burial.

However, the published results of some recent research at the University of Manchester on workplace behaviour brought to my mind a few bosses I would rather not have encountered. The research states that “people working for bosses who display psychopathic and narcissistic tendencies” not only feel depressed because of constant bullying but are also likely to engage in counterproductive behaviour. All the aggressive, toxic rhetoric can whittle down your ego and reduce you to a robot.

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Fatal heart attack may have resulted from years of workplace bullying: WCB ruling

(Canadian OH&S News) — The Workers Compensation Board of Prince Edward Island (WCB) recently awarded benefits to a Hazelbrook, P.E.I. woman, after ruling that her husband’s death by cardiac arrest had been linked to workplace bullying.

Eric Donovan, 47, was a longtime employee of Queens County Residential Services (QCRS) who passed away on Nov. 11, 2013. The WCB awarded benefits to Donovan’s widow, Lisa Donovan, following a three-year legal proceeding. The ruling reportedly occurred last December, but was not publicized by the media until late March.

The award to Lisa Donovan was “based on a finding of fact that there was bullying, that there was resultant stress, that that stress was of a degree in severity that induced a heart attack, and that heart attack was fatal,” said her lawyer, James W. Macnutt, a partner with Charlottetown law firm Macnutt & Dumont.

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HSE survey flags bullying concern (Ireland)

Less than half of respondents would recommend the HSE as an employer to family/friends

A new staff survey carried out by the HSE has found that 28 per cent of respondents had been subjected to assault, verbal or physical, in the workplace, and 31 per cent experienced bullying or harassment, with another 46 per cent witnessing bullying or harassment in the past two years.

The response rate for the HSE Employee Engagement Survey ‘Your Opinion Counts’, which found that a focus on bullying and harassment in the Irish health service was required, was only 15 per cent — although this was more than double the response rate of a similar poll conducted in 2014 (7%).

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Anti-Semitic bullying forces Jewish teen from Berlin high school

The story of a 14-year-old who had to change schools to escape anti-Semitism is making headlines in Germany. The boy’s tormentors were of Arab and Turkish descent – making the news even more explosive.

The story about the teenager, which originally ran in the UK newspaper “The Jewish Chronicle,” featured in the weekend editions of many German newspapers as well as the online edition of respected news magazine “Der Spiegel.”
The “Chronicle” reported that 14-year-old “Phillip” (not his real name) transferred from the Gemeinschaftschule in the Friedenau district of Berlin to another school after suffering anti-Semitic abuse. The teenager was subjected to verbal harassment after revealing he was Jewish. He was also grabbed and threatened with a realistic-looking pistol that later turned out to be fake.

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Hate speech in schools concerns Sacramento residents

RANCHO CORDOVA, Calif. (KCRA) —
There are growing concerns about hate crimes in the greater Sacramento region — and across the nation. On Sunday, dozens of people gathered at the Hagan Community Center in Rancho Cordova to speak out about incidents involving bullying and hateful speech directed at members of the Indian-American community.

“People have always wanted their kids to be able to come to America,” Rep. Ami Bera, D-Elk Grove, told the crowded room filled with immigrants.

Some of those immigrants said Indian-American children are being harassed and called names at school.

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Why threats to get votes for health law are more workplace bullying than political tactics

In an effort to pass the health care law, Donald Trump placed intense political pressure on members of the House, even telling one key lawmaker “I’m going to come after you,” according to reports. The president has also made personal attacks on members of the judiciary.

How do these strong-arm tactics – I would call it bullying and intimidation – affect the workings of Washington? After all, the president, as the leader of the executive branch of our government, is responsible for establishing the organizational culture and monitoring the behavior of his administration.

As a citizen, a taxpayer and a psychologist, I’m concerned that we have a chief executive exhibiting behavior that would be considered bullying in business. By setting the example that bullying is okay at the top, it could become acceptable practice in our government and by extension in our businesses. And research suggests that could not only be detrimental to the health of individuals being bullied, but also harm the country overall.

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Have you been bullied at work? Share your stories (UK)

(Editor’s Note:  I am also interested in hearing stories of workplace bullying.  I am currently working on a book on the identification, prevention and correction of workplace bullying and need more examples of actual workplace bullying incidents and situations to include.  If you are willing to share you experience, please contact me through email or through my Facebook page.  Your privacy will be respected and protected.  Thanks.  — Mike Tully)

From bosses who try to sabotage their employees’ efforts, to colleagues who intimidate their co-workers or provoke them to tears: bullying at work is surprisingly common.

Nearly a third of workers in the UK experience ongoing intimidation. And with the rise in zero-hour contracts, insecure employment and cuts to legal aid, the problem can only get worse.

Studies show that bullies tend to be bosses or those in authority, making it hard for workers to speak up. “It is easy to denounce bullying,” says employment writer Stefan Stern. “The harder task is to understand why it is happening and to suggest ways of dealing with it.”

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