Why threats to get votes for health law are more workplace bullying than political tactics

In an effort to pass the health care law, Donald Trump placed intense political pressure on members of the House, even telling one key lawmaker “I’m going to come after you,” according to reports. The president has also made personal attacks on members of the judiciary.

How do these strong-arm tactics – I would call it bullying and intimidation – affect the workings of Washington? After all, the president, as the leader of the executive branch of our government, is responsible for establishing the organizational culture and monitoring the behavior of his administration.

As a citizen, a taxpayer and a psychologist, I’m concerned that we have a chief executive exhibiting behavior that would be considered bullying in business. By setting the example that bullying is okay at the top, it could become acceptable practice in our government and by extension in our businesses. And research suggests that could not only be detrimental to the health of individuals being bullied, but also harm the country overall.

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Have you been bullied at work? Share your stories (UK)

(Editor’s Note:  I am also interested in hearing stories of workplace bullying.  I am currently working on a book on the identification, prevention and correction of workplace bullying and need more examples of actual workplace bullying incidents and situations to include.  If you are willing to share you experience, please contact me through email or through my Facebook page.  Your privacy will be respected and protected.  Thanks.  — Mike Tully)

From bosses who try to sabotage their employees’ efforts, to colleagues who intimidate their co-workers or provoke them to tears: bullying at work is surprisingly common.

Nearly a third of workers in the UK experience ongoing intimidation. And with the rise in zero-hour contracts, insecure employment and cuts to legal aid, the problem can only get worse.

Studies show that bullies tend to be bosses or those in authority, making it hard for workers to speak up. “It is easy to denounce bullying,” says employment writer Stefan Stern. “The harder task is to understand why it is happening and to suggest ways of dealing with it.”

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Parents’ advice can support or undermine targets of school bullying-prevention programs

WASHINGTON (March 21, 2017) – Children who are bystanders to a bullying incident are more likely to intervene if their parents have given them advice to intervene and less likely to intervene if their parents tell them to “stay out of it,” according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, a journal of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. The study suggests that culturally-consistent family components may enhance and promote the success of school-based anti-bullying efforts.

“Bullying is a serious problem for children, schools, and families. Our research suggests that parents have the power to address this problem through the advice they give their children at home. Nearly all children are involved in bullying situations as bystanders even if they are not a bully or a victim, so it is important that parents talk with their children about ways they can intervene if they witness someone being bullied,” said Stevie Grassetti, PhD, Post-Doctoral Researcher at the University of Delaware, and lead author of the study. “Bystander children play a powerful role in stopping bullying.”

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Culture change needed to tackle bullying problem at South Canterbury DHB , chief executive says

A “change in culture” is needed to tackle an apparent bullying issue within the South Canterbury District Health Board (SCDHB), its chief executive says.

The results of the DHB’s Staff Engagement and Wellbeing Survey, carried out in November and December last year, show 41 per cent of staff disagreed or strongly disagreed with the statement bullying was not tolerated in their work area.

Chief executive Nigel Trainor said he was “not surprised” by the survey results.

The survey was completed by 377 people, 39 per cent of the DHB’s staff.

Trainor said bullying was “not unique” to the SCDHB, but was a wider problem within the New Zealand health system.

“There’s not a lot of surprises in this to be honest. This is really confirming what I potentially believed was the case.

​”There’s a lot of bullying in health as a whole and it’s something we want to bring out to the fore and tackle, actually look at what we can do about that.”

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Police say dozens watched a teen’s sexual assault on Facebook Live — and no one reported it

A 15-year-old girl was allegedly sexually assaulted by multiple suspects, Chicago police said.

The incident was streamed on Facebook Live, the victim’s family said, where police say it was viewed by dozens of people in real time.

Chicago police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi tweeted Tuesday that police are “making good progress identifying persons of interest” in the assault on the teenager, which involved as many as five or six men or boys. The tweet mentioned that interviews are “ongoing” but police have yet to name any formal suspects or make any arrests.

“What’s even more disturbing, more than the fact that they did this, there were so many people that saw this and they didn’t pick up the phone and dial 911,” police Superintendent Eddie Johnson told WGN-TV. “That’s just not right and working on it and [trying] to bring it to a successful resolution.”

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Girls are more affected by cyberbullying

Cyberbullying affects girls more than boys – putting them off school and raising the risk of truancy, according to new research.

Being involved in the modern life scourge – either as perpetrators, victims or both – makes them feel less accepted by their peers, while boys are more able to brush it off.

And this has a knock on effect, spilling over into how important they felt school and learning were, the study found.

With boys, just those who had been a bully as well as a victim, had the same negative attitude.

It follows a government survey that found girls are twice as likely to be ‘cyberbullied’, in which youngsters use technology to harass peers, than boys.

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Obesity in the workplace

(The United States takes a similar approach to obesity as the United Kingdom.  While obesity, per se, is not generally considered a disabling condition, certain maladies related to obesity are.  For example, some individuals with obesity also suffer from diabetes.  In addition, obesity can lead to musculoskeletal problems, especially with the knees and feet.  Some employers regard morbid obesity — generally 100 pounds over what is considered a normal weight — as constituting a disability, regardless of whether there are any related conditions.  — Mike  Tully)

With reports suggesting long-term sickness and absence may be fuelled by Britain’s obesity crisis, organisations are finding themselves under pressure to foster a culture of healthy eating and living within the workplace. But they are likely to find themselves with an increasingly tricky line to tread as they work to encourage healthy living, while not seeming to be discriminatory.

The relationship between obesity and absence from work hit the headlines in December 2016 when Dame Carol Black, who advised the government on the relationship between work and health, suggested people on benefits who are obese should attend sessions with a health adviser. This, Dame Carol argued, could encourage more people claiming benefits back into work.

Cost to the economy

A 2015 report by McKinsey & Company said obesity costs the UK nearly £47bn a year, with Nice reporting that an obese person takes on average four extra sick days a year.

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A 7 Step Process For Stopping Work Bullies In Their Tracks

Publicly trashing ideas with the intention to belittle others, scoffing and dismissing any suggestions or proposals made in meetings, openly making snide remarks and frequently denouncing fellow team members at work; these are some of the common characteristics that categorize bullies at work.

American bullying experts Drs. Gary and Ruth Namie ​define bullying as a “Repeated, health-harming mistreatment of a person by one or more workers that takes the form of verbal abuse; conduct or behaviors that are threatening, intimidating, or humiliating; sabotage that prevents work from getting done; or some combination of the three.”

The bully aims to assault the dignity, trustworthiness, competence, and self-worth of the target to derive personal gains or sadistic satisfaction, often leaving the target feeling responsible, guilty, isolated and confused.

So what can we do to stop these baddies in their tracks?

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